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Lynn Weiss, Skip Bayless (host of the "Skip Bayless Show,") Dr.

Ann Wildemann (host of "Love, Sex and Relationships,") Gary Cogill, Chuck Schechner, Mark Woolsey aka Mark Elliott (1985-1991; 1996-1999; currently a senior broadcast meteorologist for The Weather Channel in Atlanta,) Jim Long, Dan Bennett, Jon Griffin, Lora Cain, Dave Cradick aka Kidd Kraddick (brief fill-in only during 5/1992 after firing at KEGL-FM,) Kevin Mc Carthy (to 2001,) Benjamin Dover, Mike Fisher, Val De Orr, Baylor Witcher (2004-2005,) Tom Kamb (2000-2001,) "Humble" Billy Hayes, Scott Anderson, Jeff Bolton, Joe Kelley (2000-01,) Dr. Notables: George "Paul" Medina, Randy Coffey, Pete Hamill, Rick Stoughton, Jason Walker, Mike Wade. Call letters stood for "ttraction." Nickname: "Newstalk 57" (11/2/1976 to 1983.) Sister station to KERA-FM (1947 version)/WFAA-FM/ KZEW-FM and the "Dallas Morning News" (formerly "Dallas News and Journal" in WFAA's earliest days.) First network-affiliated station in Texas (initially with NBC beginning 4/2/1923; later with Texas Quality Network, ABC [to 8/1/1975] and CBS thereafter,) first US station to carry educational programs, first to produce a serious radio drama series, first to air a state championship football game, the first to air inaugural ceremonies.

AM's popularity and far-reaching capabilities were used by the government to launch a civil defense system, CONELRAD ("CONtrol of ELectromagnetic RADiation,") the forerunner of the Emergency Broadcast System (now Emergency Alert System,) in 1951.

(WRR engineer Rick Teddlie co-created the CONELRAD system.) While the nuclear threat of the Cold War prompted the dedication of a national broadcast frequency, it wasn't until 1958 that the system was first used for weather alerts.

KZEW, Dallas-Fort Worth, KLDD-AM Dallas-Fort Worth.)KRQX, Dallas. Nickname: "K-Rocks." Owners: Belo, Anchor Media (1/1/1987 to format change; Anchor was owned by Fort Worth's Bass Brothers, who formerly owned KDNT.) Sister station to KZEW-FM. Tucker's Smile" (began 1934,) "Big D Jamboree" (began as "Lone Star Barndance" and "Lone Star Jamboree;" later moved to KRLD,) "Guests and Telephone," "Murphy Martin Commentary," "Saturday Night Shindig," "570 Club," "Clare Lou and M," "Slo-n-Ezy" (an "Amos-n-Andy ripoff,) "Murray Cox RFD." Station bands: The Plainsmen Quartet, The Pepper Uppers Orchestra, Step Ladder and the Saddle Tramps, Rangers Quartet, Cass County Boys/Cass County Kids, Bel Canto Quartet, Sandman Soldiers, Bumblebees Trio, Jimmie Jeffries, Elmer Bockman, Ben Mc Clusty, Hack and Willie, Peg "Pegleg" Moreland (male singer known as "King of the Little Ditty.")Notables: Mike Marshall (3/1967-9/1969,) Walter Dealey (spearheaded creation of WFAA,) Bud Buschardt (host of "57 Nostalgia Place" and "Midnight Nostalgia;" also worked at WFAA-TV,) Don Cristy, John Allen (employed with WFAA 1945-1981,) Don Norman, Jim Thomas, Lynn Woolley, Dick West (host of "Behind the News," 1950-1960, and an editorial commentary short beginning in 1/1957; concurrently at Dallas Morning News through the 1950s writing editorials, and as Editorial Director, 1960-1977,) Ben Laurie, Doug Fox (1965-66; later spent 29 years in the news department at WFAA-TV,) "Gentleman" Jim Carter, David Garcia, Bob Morrison, Rob Edwards, Kevin Mc Carthy (1978-1981,) Tom Perryman, Bob Gooding (1960-1961; then anchored for WFAA-TV newscasts 1961-1979,) Terry Lee Jenkins, Ralph "Buddy" Widman (late of KFJZ and KWBC; Sports Director, then Assistant Program Director; hosted "Sports Review" and "Football Scoreboard; began 5/1948; left for SM position at new KBCS-730AM in 7/1957; returned to WFAA-AM in 10/1958,) Bob Bruton, L. Henson, Harry Withers, Jack Schell, Bobby Brock (not to be confused with Dallas Times Herald radio/TV columnist Bob Brock,) Charlie Vann, Ralph Robison, Phoebe "Peggy" Patton (hosted a children's program in the 1940s,) Jimmy Jeffries, Ed Hogan (began 1950; hosted "Musical Party Line" and "Hogan's Hall of Hits;" into WFAA-AM sales in 1953; to WFAA-TV as chief announcer in 10/1955,) Norvell Slater (1941-1972; host of "Hymns We Love,") John Criswell (later news anchor for WFAA-TV and KDFW-TV,) Charles Mc Cord, Marty Haag, Craig Barton, Gene Baudrick, Walter Vaughn, Frank Mills, Eddie Dunn, Dick Syatt, Jim Simon, Charley Wright, Frank Munroe, Adams Calhoun, Bill Hazen, Darrell Monroe (1967-1968,) Paul Hitt (assistant on "57 Nostalgia Place,") Bob Stanford, Randy Coffey, Sharon West, Dave Naugle, Harvey Johnston, Laurel Ornish (1973-1974, news,) Ray Dunaway, Tim Kase, Pierce Allman, Edwin Bryant (as half of "Uncle Ed and Little Willie" duo,) Roy Newman (staff musician,) Ann Berry, Jim Boyd, Ed Busch, Jim Simon (news and operations director, 11/1976-1977; brought in from KABC-Los Angeles to head "Newstalk 57" in November, 1976,) Jess Smith (news and operations director, 1977-1980; replaced Jim Simon,) Joe Holstead (news and operations director, began 1980; replaced Jess Smith; originally was assistant to Smith,) Rob Milford aka Rob Williams (9/1976 to 11/2/1976; last jock to broadcast before turning into "Newstalk 57,") Noah Nelson (later a reporter for KXAS-TV, then NBC News; currently an actor,) Jim Rose (1967-68,) Connie Herrera (1978-81,) Dorothy Bell, Gary De Laune, John Johnson (as host of "The Farm Report,") Elston Brooks (later an entertainment columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram,) Tony Lawrence, Dan Cutrer, Ted Cassidy (later played "Lurch" on "The Addams Family;" was announcer who helped cover the JFK assassination by conducting witness interviews, and hosted "The Ted Cassidy Show." Left WFAA for Hollywood in 1964.)Also Murray Cox (farm reporter and host of "Murray Cox RFD,") Pauline "Polly" Cox (wife of Murray; assisted with show,) Frank Filesi, Jimmy Mc Clain (played the role of "Dr. Q.;" became a NW Texas minister in the late 1940s after leaving WFAA-AM; later voice of KIXL's "Think It Over" segments,) Marty Miller (1975,) Rex Cromwell, Bill Crowdus (host of "Man Around the House,") Bob Tripp, Dick Wheeler, Martin B.

Programs: "Sunday Blues Program" (1985-87; syndicated as "Blues Deluxe" since 1988,) "Midnight Concert Series." Broadcasted SMU football games. Campbell, Dave Cooke, Howard Bogarte, Wilbur Ard aka "Deacon," Pat Couch (later a reporter with KXAS-TV,) Roy Cowan, Lynn Bigler, Ken Rundel (as host of "Hotline" and "Guests and Telephone,") Steve Goddard, Ed Busch (as host of "The Ed Busch Show,") Julie Benell, Dave Anthony, Don Thomson, Ken Sasso aka Ken Summers (morning show host in the mid-1970s; famous for character "Guido,") Lee Douglas, Mitch Carr (1980-82,) Terry Bell, Cris Cross, Travis Linn (began 1962; later anchor on WFAA-TV,) Lotie Lofton, Jim Fry (later a reporter for sister WFAA-TV,) Ann Mc Carthy, Ralph Nimmons (began 1934; assistant manager of station until promotion to Station Manager of WFAA-TV in 12/1950,) K. Mc Clure (likely the same person as Ken [Knox] Mc Clure,) Mary Sue (Suzy) Mc Cord, Bob Dahlgren, Jeff Dale aka Mike Millard, Troy Dungan (former WFAA-TV weatherman; weather-watcher for "Early Birds" program as a teen in the 1940s,) Ira Lipson (PD, and concurrently PD of KZEW when KZEW launched,) Arch Campbell, Herb Jepko (as host of "Herb Jepko's Nitecap Show,") Nick Ramsey (as host of "Carnival of Music,") Bill Blanchard (as host of "Business News,") Chuck Murphy, Donald Easterwood, Walter Evans (1959-1964; later anchor with KRLD/KDFW-TV,) Jan Isbell Fortune, Jamie Friar, Paul Gleiser (1973; returned 7/1976-4/1982,) Helen Harris, Don Valentine (APD; began 1947,) Peter Molyneaux, Karl Lambertz (1933-1946; returned 2/1952,) Andy Pollin, Greg Maiuro, Marcel Jones, Alex Keese (began 1930; Music Director, Commercial Manager, then General Manager in 1952,) Russell Koch, Tony Lawrence, Bob Etheridge, Ralph Gould (engineer,) Talmadge Naylor, Ted De Hay (began 1932,) Robert S.

Powerhouse WBAP was awarded a clear channel position on the dial; it is one of only a small handful of stations in the nation that's allowed to blast its signal to a reported 42 states!

And to honor the art of "DX-ing" (distance listening,) Wednesdays after 3PM were declared "Silent Night" in the '20s...low-powered stations turned off their transmitters so that high-powered stations across the US could be easily received on anyone's dial.

(By mid-1922, all five DFW stations agreed to a timesharing plan on each frequency.) November 11, 1928 was declared "National Frequency Allocation Day," when the Federal Radio Commission (FRC, predecessor to the FCC) brought organization to the dial by assigning dedicated frequencies to the strongest stations, and culling out many of the small-time opportunists who weren't serious about broadcasting.AM radio in Dallas-Fort Worth, as with the rest of the nation, was mostly entertainment and news programming in its infancy; however, its value and importance was secured during World War II as the center of information for a concerned public.With the introduction of television to the masses in the late 1940s, radio's demise was assumed to be imminent.By December, 2007, all simulcasting stations will be required to give up their original frequency and begin broadcasting solely on the new dial position.But this is not to say AM is totally dead, or ever will be in Dallas..WBAP and KRLD ranked in the Top 5 for many decades, according to Arbitron.