Physical dating violence among high school students

20 Apr

Adolescents, especially girls, are at increased risk for STIs, including HIV, as a result of coercive and violent sex.

Sexual coercion is associated with having multiple sexual partners, unprotected sex, alcohol and/or drug use before sex, substance use, and STIs (From a public health perspective, primary prevention of IPV is desirable, although most of the available research focuses on the health care response to the survivors of IPV, both while a woman is still exposed to abuse (secondary prevention) and when she is experiencing the long-term health problems associated with IPV (tertiary prevention).

Often traumatized, says Heather Senior Monroe, MSW, LCSW, psychotherapist, trauma specialist, and senior clinician at Newport Academy, a nationwide treatment center for teenagers and their families.

University of New Hampshire Carsey School of Public Policy.

They were most likely to speak up or otherwise get involved when they saw a friend’s boyfriend or girlfriend behaving in a jealous or controlling manner, when they heard comments such as “she deserved to be raped,” or when they believed their friend was being abused or was in a potentially dangerous situation.

Fewer students were likely to express concern or disapproval over sexual jokes, comments, and gestures.

Surprisingly, students were least likely to get involved when a friend appeared to be drunk at a party and were taken out of the room. According to the University of New Hampshire report, some of the biggest barriers were a desire to avoid drama, fear of social repercussion, the nature of their own relationship with either the victim or the perpetrator or a feeling that the behavior wasn’t actually abusive.

Where does all this leave the victim of high school dating abuse?